CD 7 – December 2015

As of today, we are T-minus 7 days until Christmas Day. When I was a child, getting into the single digits when counting down until Christmas made me downright giddy! As an adult? Not so much! Usually because while the rest of my family is usually spending this time wrapping the entirety of their gifts, I still have gifts remaining on the “to buy” list. I’m such a procrastinator. It’s really very sad.

wpid-procrastinate

am very proud to say however, that what I have not procrastinated this past week is the blood work my RE wanted me to get done on CD 3. They checked my Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), my DHEA Sulfate (a male hormone, or ‘androgen’), and my Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH.) All came back perfectly within normal ranges with the exception of the DHEA-S. It came back rather low at 65 ug/dL, with normal ranges being between 96-512 ug/dL. That sounds concerning, right? Anytime something is low or high on blood work that means there’s a major problem, right?

Well, not according to the RE’s office. I sent them a message via the hospital’s secure site asking what it means that my levels were so low. I received a reply back the next day stating that low levels meant nothing; they would only be concerned if my levels were higher. According to ObGyn.net, most women with PCOS have DHEA-S levels of 200+ ug/dL. That completely backs up the RE’s comment regarding my ovaries appearing completely normal on u/s, and not at all like polycystic ovaries. But does it really mean nothing that my levels were so low??

Women to Women was able to shed a little more light on the subject of low DHEA-S. Some of the signs of low DHEA-S can be extreme fatigue, depression, aching joints, lower immunity, and a loss of libido. Wait, what? Loss of libido? You mean … that’s a thing? I thought it was just me! And the aching joints, too? You mean there may actually be a reason I feel like I’m 100 years old most mornings, and almost totally disinterested in sex most of the time?! Why didn’t I know about this before???

Probably because I’ve never really asked before. I’d never ever considered the possibility that my adrenal glands and their proper function (or lack thereof) could have an affect on my fertility – or anything else, for that matter. But now that I have irrefutable proof that my levels are indeed low, I fully intend to speak with the RE about it. Lower levels may be a good thing as far as the fertility aspect of my life, but if there is indeed a link to, and could thereby be a possible cause of my low libido, then I want to address it. No. Not want to address it. I NEED to address it. But why bother if the doctor isn’t worried about it?

Simple. Because – ain’t no babies gonna get made if they ain’t no boots gettin’ knocked around, know what I mean?!

flirty smiley

Truth be told, I want to boost my libido a little. That being said, I also know that messing around with the production of your adrenal glands can be tricky, and can be dangerous if done incorrectly. DHEA-S has been hailed to be everything from “terrible for your health” to the “Fountain of Youth” and has been marketed OTC by several different companies. I’ve always lived by the old adage that “If something seems too good to be true, it probably is,” and as for the majority of claims by manufacturers – most of them are falling into the ‘To Good To Be True’ category for me.

Rather than running out and stocking up on DHEA-S from the local pharmacy, I plan to discuss it with the RE as soon as I see him next. While the thought of boosting my sexual desire sounds awesome, the last thing I want to do is to add something into my body that might hinder our TTC process in any way. The good news in all of this is that I am almost certain that I did indeed O all on my own last month, and I’m keeping my fingers crossed that I do again this month as well. If Fertility Friend is correct in predicting my O date, I should O on Christmas Eve this cycle! Here’s to hoping and praying for another Christmas miracle this year!

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